The Journal of Sports Chiropractic and Rehabilitation


Chiropractic OnLine Today is pleased to present Abstract's from
William and Wilkin's
The Journal of Sports Chiropractic and Rehabilitation (formerly Chiropractic Sports Medicine).

You have selected Abstracts from
Chiropractic Sports Medicine's
Volume 2, Number 2; June 1988


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Introduction

Table of Contents

Abstracts

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Introduction

Chiropractic OnLine Today is pleased to present the Table of Contents and Abstracts from Williams and Wilkins Publication Chiropractic Sports Medicine. By reviewing as much of the literature as possible, every practitioner will be offering their patients the state of the art in Chiropractic care.


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Table of Contents

Features

Simple Bone Cysts in Athletes
	Lindsay J. Rowe and James R. Brandt   . . . . . . . . . p. 33
Proximal Tibiofibular Joint Dysfunction: An Oerlooked Diagnosis
	Bressler and Marshall N. Deltoff    . . . . . . . . . p. 45
Meniscotibial (Coronary) Ligament Sprain: Diagnosis and Treatment
	Warren I. Hammer    . . . . . . . . . p. 48
Athletic Low Back Pain Originating from the Neural Arch
	Scott D. Banks    . . . . . . . . . p. 51
Pathomechanics and Treatment of Hallux Limitus: A Case Report
	Thomas C. Michaud    . . . . . . . . . p. 55


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Abstracts

Simple Bone Cysts in Athletes

Lindsay J. Rowe, B. App. Sc. DACBR, FCCR, DC
James R. Brandt, DC FACO

Abstract: Among the many injuries suffered by athletes are those due to inherent structural weaknesses. Among these are benign bone tumors, especially simple bone cysts. Ten cases are reported and a review is made of the literature regarding their clinical, pathological, radiological, and treatment features. All sports physicians and especially those who deal with younger athletes should be cognizant of this entity especially when there has been a sudden appearance of pain with signs of fracture. Emphasis is placed on the role of radiography for accurate diagnosis.

Proximal Tibiofibular Joint Dysfunction: An Overlooked Diagnosis

Hartley B. Bressler, DC and Marshall N. Deltoff, DC

Abstract: One of the most frequently missed sites of knee pain is the proximal tibiofibular (PTF) joint. Abnormal dynamics of this articulation can occur in the absence of fracture or dislocation. A case of PTF joint dysfunction is presented which responded well to manipulative therapy.

Knee pain with activity is not uncommon and has been attributed to etiologies such as degenerative joint disease, foot pronation, congenital malalignment, muscle weakness, or inadequate muscle conditioning and overuse. An often overloooked casue of lateral knee pain is dysfunction of the proximal tibiofibular (PTF) joint. These superior joint restrictions have an excellent prognosis when treated with manipulation and prompt therapy can avert development of abnormal ankle mechanics.

Meniscotibial (Coronary) Ligament Sprain: Diagnosis and Treatment

Warren I. Hammer, M.S., , DC, DABCO

Abstract: Coronary ligament sprain is often overlooked as a cause of knee pain. This ligament may be the primary source of pain or be a residual source of pain long after a meniscus or collateral ligamentous sprain has healed. This article attempts to differentially diagnose coronary sprain and explain a treatment to resolve the condition.

Athletic Low Back Pain Originating from the Neural Arch

Scott D. Banks, DC

Abstract: The causes of athletic low back pain are reviewed. The lumbar neural arches are uniquely susceptible to injury in sports involving trunk extension. The majority of cases involve mechanical joint pain and is usually resolved with manipulation. Failure of response to initial treatment should illicit a systematic process of diagnostic imaging to evaluate bony injury.

Pathomechanics and Treatment of Hallux Limitus: A Case Report

Thomas C. Michaud

Abstract: A case is presented relating excessive subtalar joint pronation during the propulsive phase of stance with the development of hallux limitus. Treatment consisted of proper orthotic management coupled with manipulation of the tarsometatarsal articulations. Early diagnosis and treatment bis emphasized if ankylosis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is to be avoided.


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Chiropractic Sports Medicine is published quarterly by Williams and Wilkins Publishers. Williams and Wilkins may be contacted directly at:
800-638-0672


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